Maintenance

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Bellows-blown pipes generally require less maintenance than mouth-blown types. Check thread wrappings regularly as they may slacken. For joints, add a few turns of sewing cotton rubbed lightly through beeswax. If the sliding wrappings become slack, put a few turns of sewing thread, unwaxed, on top of the existing wrapping.


Reeds

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The chanter reed is seated in a tapered socket in the top of the chanter, fitting into the chanter stock in the neck of the bag. A good chanter reed can last for years, and ideally should be left untouched. If it becomes necessary to remove the chanter, or the


New to Bellows?

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Putting on the Bellows Fasten the belt above the waist so that the bellows are just above your right elbow. Close the rucksack-style buckle on the arm-strap, and open the strap fully. Put your arm through the strap from above and tighten the strap until it grips your arm firmly


SCOTTISH SMALLPIPES

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These are a quiet bellows – blown bagpipe with an attractive tone. The chanter is open-ended and plays the Highland Bagpipe scale of one octave with a flattened seventh. The chanter is normally played using the Scottish system of covered fingering, but may be played with closed fingering. These pipes


NORTHUMBRIAN PIPES

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These are a small bellows-blown bagpipe with a sweet, mellow tone. The simplest type has a keyless chanter and three drones, a pattern dating back to the early eighteenth century. The keyless chanter is obviously rather limited, although a surprisingly large number of tunes are available. Almost all the sets


Makers of Northumbrian and Scottish Smallpipes

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Originally from the North East of England, we now live and work in the North West, near Carlisle – close to the Lake District, Scottish Borders and Northumberland. Richard has been making and playing bellows pipes for more than 25 years, having finished his first set in 1975. During this